Unlike most minor steam car makers, there is a moderate amount of information about Conrad Motor Carriage Company.

The Conrad Motor Carriage Company of Buffalo, NY was incorporated in April 1900 with a woefully inadequate capital stock of $25,000. During Christmas 1901, a "large Conrad delivery wagon ran for a week making deliveries for a large Buffalo department Store. It did the work of three horse-drawn vehicles without trouble. A similar wagon carried mail from the main post office in Buffalo to the Pas American Exposition."[2]

In 1902, the Conrad Motor Carriage Company began manufacturing gasoline cars.  The company failed in July 1903 and declared bankruptcy in August 1903.[3]

Bently describes the technical details of the Conrad. The "1903 Steam Model 65 Special [was] powered by a two-cylinder, six hp engine located amidships under the frame and enclosed in a special hood. "A 20 in. boiler (at rear) produced super-heated steam from 650 copper tubes at 160 psi, water being stored in a 35 gallon tank. Eight gallons of gasoline fed the burner which had a patented pilot light to keep up a head of steam. Weight of this buggy was 1,004 pounds with a two-passenger panel back seat body and full tanks. One of four models (two of them commercial vehicles) with a price of $800 - $2,500."[4]

The 1903 Steam Model 65 Special was priced at $850.

Conrad produced a Dos-a-Dos in 1902.[5]

1900 Advertising

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, Magazine Advertisement

John Conde dated this advertisement from Floyd Clymer as 1900, but it is likely 1902. Photocopy John A. Conde Collection.

1901 Advertising

1902 Advertising

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

These four small advertisements appeared in unknown magazines in 1902.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, April 2, 1902, Cucle and Automobile Trade Journal, page 40

This full page advertisement appeared in the April 2, 1902 issue of Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal, page 40.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, May 17, 1902 Scientific American.

This May 17, 1902 advertisement appeared in the Scientific American.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, July 19, 1902, Automobile and Motor Review

This July 19, 1902 advertisement in Automoblie and Motor Reviewpromoted the Conrad Steamer and its 81 miole trip over mountains between Pittsburg and Johnstown, PA. John A. Conde Collection.

Charles and Marie Melzer in 1902 Conrad Steam Car

This 1902 photographs shows Charles Melzer and his daughter, Marie in the family's Conrad Steamer. Anonymous Source.

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, May 17, 1902 Scientific American Advertisement

This small advertisement appeared in the Scientific American of May 17, 1902, Vol. LXXXVI, No. 20, page 358.

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, The Hub magazine advertisement, ca: 1902

This full page Conrad advertisement came from The Hub of an unknown date, probably about 1902.

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, 1903 Catalogue Introducing Its Gasoline Cars

By late 1902, the company owners had seen the successful rise of gasoline automobiles and in 1903 added a line to its steam car line.

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, 1903 Catalogue, Intorducing Gasoline Automobiles.

The page 3 text is self explanatory.

1903 Advertising: Steam to Gasoline

In early 1903, Conrad made the change from steam to gasoline. Following March 1903, only the Conrad gasoline cars were featured in its advertising.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, January 2, 1903, The Automobile, p. 50.

This January 1, 1903 advertisement promoted the Conrad Steam Car's Pennsylvania oddesy from PIttsburg to Johnstown. Photocopy. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, January 24, 1903, The Automobile, photocopy.

This January 24, 1903 advertisement in The Automobilepromoted the Conrad's gasoline powered automobile. Photocopy. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1903, Floyd Clyner, page 40.

John Conde copied this 1903 advertisement from Floyd Clymer. Photocopy. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, February 19, 1903, Motor Age Magazine, p. 7, Conde Collection

This February 19, 1903 article notes the appearance of the Conrad gasoline tonneau and the Conruad runabout with collapsible surry rear seat shown together at the New York Auto Show. Photocopy. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, March 5 ,1903, Motor Age Magazine, p. 26.

This March 5, 1903 advertisement in Motor Age makes no mention of steam powered automobiles. Photocopy. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, March 14, 1903, Scientific American Magazine Advertisement, Conde Collection.

This March 14, 1903 advertisement in The Scientific American promoted the Conrad's steam and gasoline powered automobiles. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, March 14, 1903, Scientific American, P. 200. Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

This small advertisement appeared in the Scientific American of March 14, 1903, page 200. It is misdated as 1902. It is a 1903.

Conrad Motor Carriage Company, March 28, 1903 Scientific American Advertisement Conrad Motor Carriage Company, May 23, 1903 Scientific American Advertisement

These small advertisements appeared (right) in the Scientific American of May 23, 1903, page 404, and (left) in the Scientific American of March 28, 1903, page 233. As early as March 1, 1903, Conrad shifted its advertising to gasoline powered Automobiles only.

wertwertwertwert Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

These two advertisements appeared in The Scientific American on May 23, 1903 promoting the Conrad Gasoline Motor Vehicles.John A. Conde Collection (on left).

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

The Conrad Company placed this advertisement in The Strand for May 1903. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

The Conrad Company placed this advertisement in The Strand for June 1903. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

Floyd Clymer reproduced this page from trade magazine, likely Cycle and Autombile Trade Jouranal. Clymer dated the advertisement as 1903, but it is likely earlier.

1904 & 1905 Advertising

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

On March 2, 1904, W. J. Hayes, the Trustee in Bankruptcy, placed this advertisement in Horseless Age announcing the sale of the Conrad assets. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

On February 1, 1905, W. J. Hayes was still advertising the Conrad assets in the Cycle and Automobile Trade Journal, p. 235. John A. Conde Collection.

Contad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 unknown magazine advertisement

John Conde's Conrad File FolderJohn A. Conde Collection.

Modern Ephemera

Franklin Mint, Conrad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 Silver Coin, Obverse Franklin Mint, Conrad Motor Carriage Company, 1902 Silver Coin, Reverse

The Franklin Mint issued this Conrad Motor Carriage Company coin in 1970.

Floyd Clymer's 1945 Steam Car Scrapbook lists three models of the Conrad in 1903.[6]

The Conrad Steam Model 65 Special: "Two-passenger; panel back seat; weight with tanks filled, 1,004 pounds; 2-inch tires; 28-inch wheels; capacity of gasoline tanks, 8 gallons; capacity of water tanks, 35 gallons. Price $850."

"Dos-a-Dos; stick back seat; seating capacity 4 passengers; weight, tanks filled, 1,000 pounds; 2-inch tires; 28-inch wheels; capacity of gasoline tanks, 8 gallons; capacity of water tank, 38 gallons. Price, $800."

Conrad Steam Model 77: "Panel seat; seating capacity, 4 passengers; 3-inch tires; 28-inch wheels; gasoline tank capacity, 8 gallons; water tank capacity, 38 gallons. Price, 1,200."

Lacakwanna Motor Co.

Buffalo, NY

1904

The Conrad Company made mainly steam cars, light 2-cylinder vehicles with side-tiller steering and single chain drive. In 1903 they introduced two gasoline engined cars of 8 hp and 12 hp, both with 2-cylinder engines, three speeds, and single chain drive. They [sic] were out of business by the end of 1903, but one of their gasoline engined models was exhibited by the Lackawanna Motor Co. at the 1904 New York Show. However, this latter company concentrated mainly on engines.[7]

[1]SACA Forum , Phorum 5, It's Like Fast and Stuff. Posts by Don Anger David K. Nergaard March 2002.

[2] Bentley, John, Oldtime Steam Cars, (New York, NY, ARCO Publishing Co., second printing, 1969), p. 75.

[3]Bentley, John, Oldtime Steam Cars, (New York, NY, ARCO Publishing Co., second printing, 1969), p. 75.

[4] Bentley, John, Oldtime Steam Cars, (New York, NY, ARCO Publishing Co., second printing, 1969), p. 75.

[5]Derr, Thomas S., The Modern Steam Car and its Background: With a supplement on Historical Steam Cars by Floyd Clymer, (Los Angeles, CA., Floyd Clymer, 1952, 2nd reprint), p. 104.

[6] Clymer, Floyd, Floyd Clymer's Historical Motor Scapbook: Steam Car Edition, Vol. 1. (This book is copy No. 76692), (Los Angeles, CA, Clymer Motors, 1945), p. 49. This information seems to have been copied from some publication, but Clymer does not indicate where.

[7]Georgano, G. N., Encyclopedia of American Automobile, (New York, E. P. Dutton & Co., 1968), p. 48-49.