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The American inventor, William Church (circa 17781863) invented the first type setting machine in 1822 while a resident of Boston. He secured English patents and then moved to Bordesley Green, near Birmingham to promote his invention. He took out patents for a number of other items and processes, including a marine engine patent in 1829. This apparently led him to patent his first steam carriage in 1832, which was never built. A second patent in 1835 led to the creation of the London and Birmingham Steam Carriage Company. The company prospectus described this vehicle as having a 60 HP engine and being heavy enough to carry 15 tons at 15 miles an hour.

"The Science Museum has an engraving by Josiah Allen, which shows it as a large three-wheeled vehicle with passenger compartments front and rear similar to conventional stagecoach bodies, with seating on top, and the driver mounted high at the front operating a tiller for steering. The central part contained the mechanism. It would seem however that this was not the vehicle which was eventually built. Although some accounts suggest that it operated on a daily basis between London and Birmingham, Prosser suggests that it never in fact completed a journey, and the company was wound up."

This account is drawn exclusively from Wikipedia, which includes the following citations.[1]

Dr. William Church's Steam Omnibus, England, ca: 1832 - 1835, Unidentified 19th Century Publication. Dr. William Church's Steam Omnibus, England, ca: 1832 - 1835, Unidentified 19th Century Publication.

This unidentified 19th Century print shows CHurch's Steam Omnibus facing left. There is information about his Steam Omnibus on the reverse.

William Church Steam Coach, London to Birmingham, 1932, Press Photo, Front William Church Steam Coach, London to Birmingham, 1932, Press Photo,, Reverse

This press photo, minus its ideifying information, shows Church's Steam-Omnibus facing to the right.

[1] "Popular Science Monthly, Volume 57, August 1900". Retrieved 21 December 2012.

Huss, Richard E. (1976). Dr. Church's "Hoax": An Assessment of Dr. William Church's Typographical Inventions in which is enunciated Church's Law. Graphic Crafts, Inc. ISBN 1-299-79852-7

Science and Society Picture Library - Search

Prosser, R.B. (1881) Birmingham Inventors and Inventions Private publication, reprinted 1970 Wakefield: S. R. Publishers.

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